1. “It would have hurt me not to work on this” — that’s the sort of passion that leads to great new products.

    — Daring Fireball

  2. When I give up on all my desires for attention and financial success I made something that brings those things to me naturally.

    — Stegersaurus.com » Blog Archive » Rant: Time To Give Up, But In a Good Way!

  3. 13 August 2014

    60 notes

    Reblogged from
    bijan

    We travel, initially, to lose ourselves; and we travel, next, to find ourselves

    — 

    Pico Iyer 

    Discovered this gem of a quote upon reading Christopher Michael’s wonderful post on searching and reflecting. Hit home on so many levels. 

    (via bijan)

  4. This hope can be elusive, I know. It is deeply non-metric, invisible to A/B testing, and irreducible to data. It does not register on our Personal Digital Dashboards or vibrate our phones. It is still unevenly distributed, but it is more widely available than ever before. It lies in the gradual spread, one brain at a time, of a kind of knowledge about ourselves and one another that until very recently was held tight by a very small group that made mostly cynical use of it.

    — Doing is knowing: “Sweet Jane” and the Web — Wordyard

  5. Nostalgia

    What is remembered. What never existed except as remembrance. 

    Carole Maso, AVA

  6. All good Southerners are pretty much kinda mad.

    — Interview with Alton Brown | Garden and Gun

  7. Balcony at Square Books:  1999/2014. 

  8. believermag:

Drawing by Josephine Demme
Fiction Seminar
Ben Marcus
Technologies of Heartbreak 
This seminar will examine how emotion is attempted and transmitted in fiction, the various ways readers are captured and made to care about a story.  Emotional effects—rapture, sympathy, desire, empathy, fascination, grief, repulsion—will be considered as techniques of language, enabled or muted by narrative context, acoustics, phrasing, and our own predispositions.  How can a sentence, a phrase, a paragraph cause us to feel things, and is a high degree of feeling akin to “liking” a book?  What is it to care about a character or the progress of a story, and how was that care installed in us?  What are the various kinds and sequences of sentences that, when placed in a narrative, can produce emotional engagement in a reader, affection or distraction, or is it impossible to isolate our reaction to a book in terms of its language?  The focus will be on some rhetorical strategies novelists and story writers have used to impart feeling, among them: concealment, indirection, revelation, confession, flat affect, irony, hyperbole, repetition, sentimentality, elusiveness, and sincerity.  A tentative book list follows. 
2/4 - Revolutionary Road - Richard Yates
2/11 - Mrs. Bridge - Evan S. Connell
2/18 - Everything That Rises Must Converge - Flannery O’Connor2/25 - A Personal Matter - Kenzabarō Ōe
3/1 - Jernigan - David Gates3/4  - Housekeeping - Marilynne Robinson
3/11 - The Emigrants - W. G. Sebald3/25 -  Winesburg, Ohio - Sherwood Anderson 
4/1 - Blood Meridian - Cormac McCarthy
4/8 - The Fifth Child - Doris Lessing
4/22 - Two Serious Ladies - Jane Bowles
4/29 - The Sheltering Sky - Paul Bowles
5/6 - Correction - Thomas Bernhard
See an interview with Ben Marcus about the syllabus.

    believermag:

    Drawing by Josephine Demme

    Fiction Seminar

    Ben Marcus

    Technologies of Heartbreak 

    This seminar will examine how emotion is attempted and transmitted in fiction, the various ways readers are captured and made to care about a story.  Emotional effects—rapture, sympathy, desire, empathy, fascination, grief, repulsion—will be considered as techniques of language, enabled or muted by narrative context, acoustics, phrasing, and our own predispositions.  How can a sentence, a phrase, a paragraph cause us to feel things, and is a high degree of feeling akin to “liking” a book?  What is it to care about a character or the progress of a story, and how was that care installed in us?  What are the various kinds and sequences of sentences that, when placed in a narrative, can produce emotional engagement in a reader, affection or distraction, or is it impossible to isolate our reaction to a book in terms of its language?  The focus will be on some rhetorical strategies novelists and story writers have used to impart feeling, among them: concealment, indirection, revelation, confession, flat affect, irony, hyperbole, repetition, sentimentality, elusiveness, and sincerity.  A tentative book list follows. 

    2/4 - Revolutionary Road - Richard Yates

    2/11 - Mrs. Bridge - Evan S. Connell

    2/18 - Everything That Rises Must Converge - Flannery O’Connor

    2/25 - A Personal Matter - Kenzabarō Ōe

    3/1 - Jernigan - David Gates

    3/4  - Housekeeping - Marilynne Robinson

    3/11 - The Emigrants - W. G. Sebald

    3/25 -  Winesburg, Ohio - Sherwood Anderson 

    4/1 - Blood Meridian - Cormac McCarthy

    4/8 - The Fifth Child - Doris Lessing

    4/22 - Two Serious Ladies - Jane Bowles

    4/29 - The Sheltering Sky - Paul Bowles

    5/6 - Correction - Thomas Bernhard

    See an interview with Ben Marcus about the syllabus.

  9. Fort Morgan.  1981/2008.